Material World
The Great Celebrity Naked Photo Leak of 2014 – or perhaps we should call it The Great Celebrity Naked Photo Leak of August 2014, given that this happens so often that there won’t be only one this year – is meant to remind women of their place. Don’t get too high and mighty, ladies. Don’t step out of line. Don’t do anything to upset or disappoint men who feel entitled to your time, bodies, affection or attention. Your bared body can always be used as a weapon against you. You bared body can always be used to shame and humiliate you. Your bared body is at once desired and loathed.

visionmakermedia:

Buffy Sainte Marie breastfeeding Cody on Sesame Street.

This appeared in the food sovereignty tags for World Breastfeeding week. Which is kind of a nice way of framing it to people who have hysterics about breastfeeding in public.

thekidshouldseethis:

The Black Egret’s Umbrella Trick.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

The Black Egret’s Umbrella Trick.

Watch the video.

dc-via-chicago:


How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014

dc-via-chicago:

How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014

progressiveauspol:

Slavery in Australia

Starting from the 19th century Kanakas ( a now derogatory term for South Sea Islanders) were brought to Australia to work on sugar plantations. The majority were kidnapped or brought to Australia under false pretenses. Upon arrival they were subject to back breaking labour. Mortality rates reached as high as 10%, many dying from inadequate clothing in winter as well as diseases like dysentery and typhoid. Some were brutally attacked and murdered by white labourers who saw the slaves as threats to their own wages and working conditions. In addition there were widespread  accounts of slave owners branding the labourers like cattle.

After federation many were repatriated as a result of the White Australia policy though some remained, either remaining illegally or given exemptions. It is estimated some 20,000 of their descendants now live in Australia, many populating coastal towns of QLD and NSW. (X)(X)(X)

ofanotherfashion:

image

Not all women in the 1920s were flappers. This California-based Chicana gunslinger in pants, button down shirt, and tie is Maria Alatorre (ca. 1925). I love photos like this because they’re visual evidence of the wide range of femininities that have always existed.

Credit: Los Angeles Public Library

kimberlyalidio:

For the record, ever since I sued Monsanto in 1999 for its illegal Bt cotton trials in India, I have received death threats, my websites have been hacked and turned into porn sites, the chairman of a girls’ college founded by my grandfather, has been harassed. Actions have been taken to impede Navdanya’s work by attempting to bribe my colleagues to leave – and they have failed. None of these systemic attacks over the last two decades have deterred me from doing my research and activism with responsibility, integrity, and compassion. The concerted PR assault on me for the last two years from Lynas, Specter and an equally vocal Twitter group is a sign that the global outrage against the control over our seed and food, by Monsanto through GMOs, is making the biotech industry panic.

Character assassination has always been a tool used by those who cannot successfully defend their message. Although they think such slander will destroy my career, they don’t understand that I consciously gave up a ‘career’ in 1982 for a life of service. The spirit of service inspired by the truth, conscience and compassion cannot be stopped by threats or media attacks. For me, science has always been about service, not servitude.

so-treu:

like when beyonce said “i woke up this way: flawless” she’s saying that flawless is not dependent on how she looks at a given moment; by dent of being alive, just by being authentic to herself, she’s flawless. 

not “i woke up with this hair laid and makeup did and decked out clothes”. which is how everyone else apparently interpreted it.

smdxn:

Woman Is First to Be Ruled Eligible for Asylum in U.S. on Basis of Domestic Abuse

The nation’s highest immigration court has found for the first time that women who are victims of severe domestic violence in their home countries can be eligible for asylum in the United States.
The decision on Tuesday by the Board of Immigration Appeals in the case of a battered wife from Guatemala resolved nearly two decades of hard-fought legal battles over whether such women could be considered victims of persecution. The ruling could slow the pace of deportations from the Southwest border, because it creates new legal grounds for women from Central America caught entering the country illegally in the surge this summer in their fight to remain here.
The board reached its decision after the Obama administration changed a longstanding position by the federal government and agreed that the woman, Aminta Cifuentes, could qualify for asylum.

smdxn:

Woman Is First to Be Ruled Eligible for Asylum in U.S. on Basis of Domestic Abuse

The nation’s highest immigration court has found for the first time that women who are victims of severe domestic violence in their home countries can be eligible for asylum in the United States.

The decision on Tuesday by the Board of Immigration Appeals in the case of a battered wife from Guatemala resolved nearly two decades of hard-fought legal battles over whether such women could be considered victims of persecution. The ruling could slow the pace of deportations from the Southwest border, because it creates new legal grounds for women from Central America caught entering the country illegally in the surge this summer in their fight to remain here.

The board reached its decision after the Obama administration changed a longstanding position by the federal government and agreed that the woman, Aminta Cifuentes, could qualify for asylum.

Punishment Band I: Helen Higgins. United Kingdom.
Museum Intervention: Contemporary interpretation of 19th Century punishment bands found at Christ’s Hospital Museum, West Sussex, UK. (via Saatchi Art Artist: Helen Higgins)

Punishment Band I: Helen Higgins. United Kingdom.

Museum Intervention: Contemporary interpretation of 19th Century punishment bands found at Christ’s Hospital Museum, West Sussex, UK. (via Saatchi Art Artist: Helen Higgins)

Women are taught to ‘satisfy other people’s standards and then apologize for when we don’t live up to whatever we think they want from us, even if we don’t really know what that is.’

electricrain:

Yohji Yamamoto SS2008

Marine biologist Rachel Carson and cat.

Marine biologist Rachel Carson and cat.

elanormcinerney:

my friend gave birth to a child last night and she was telling me about the horror show of blood “there was blood on the walls!” “then half a litre just came out of me from somewhere!” and I was very awed and serious like “whoa you are a human blood bag”

I like the qualifier “to a child” here. In case the blood volume convinced the reader that all progeny involved were demons.