Material World
these-lumping-lumps:

Somebody posted these all around school, and now I know what it feels like to be proud of ones school.

these-lumping-lumps:

Somebody posted these all around school, and now I know what it feels like to be proud of ones school.

(via Green Kitchen Stories » Fresh Pea, Mint & Coconut Soup)

jaclcfrost:

bare minimum? i thought you meant bear minimum. as in the smallest amount of bears possible. which is why i brought one bear. there’s one bear. aka. the smallest amount of bears possible. i mean this is a problem but at least it’s not like. bear maximum

lustik:

The Wood Stacker - Unearthed via Yatzer.
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

The Wood Stacker - Unearthed via Yatzer.

Lustiktwitter | pinterest | etsy

The worst part is that this is a self-fulfilling prophecy: If men make an assumption that women aren’t great at tech, then those men won’t help mentor women. Women will then start believing they aren’t great at tech or feel alienated from the community. As a result, there will be no women in tech, which just perpetuates the stereotype and the cycle.

Last year, soon after I’d moved into a co-working space, I was working on yet another Saturday afternoon. A fellow founder in the space — a male, early forties — started chatting with me. He’d just started working on his own startup, and had a question.

“I see you in here every day working late, and on the weekends. I’m building out my own team and was just wondering how he keeps you motivated to work so hard?”

“What do you mean?” I asked. I was thoroughly confused. “Its my own startup. Of course I’m motivated.”

“Ohhh,” his voiced trailed off. “I just thought… well, I just assumed he was the founder.” The guy pointed at Marcin’s desk. Marcin just happened to be the only male on the team who worked in that office.
Call me opportunistic, I just thought I could get better people, with less competition, because we were willing to understand the skills and capabilities that these women had. There is a great arbitrage there, we would give them more responsibility and greater share of the rewards, than they were likely to get anywhere else and that was still somewhat cheaper to what we would have had to pay for someone less good for someone of a different gender.

Tech exec Evan Thornley boasts about hiring women because they cost less

Wow. And he used this slide:

Really. 

(via micdotcom)

podkins:

Gigantic Knitting Art by Little Dandelion.  Amazing.

podkins:

Gigantic Knitting Art by Little Dandelion.  Amazing.

chloesevenknee:

matisse’s assistant, annelies nelck (1953)

chloesevenknee:

matisse’s assistant, annelies nelck (1953)

everydaydude:

Tower of London
London, UK | 2014

everydaydude:

Tower of London

London, UK | 2014

erikkwakkel:

Norwich pattern books

These happy-looking books from the 18th century contain records. Not your regular historical records - who had died or was born, or how much was spent on bread and beer - but a record of cloth patterns available for purchase by customers. They survive from cloth producers in Norwich, England, and they are truly one of a kind: a showcase of cloth slips with handwritten numbers next to them for easy reference. The two lower images are from a pattern book of the Norwich cloth manufacturer John Kelly, who had such copies shipped to overseas customers in the 1760s. Hundreds of these beautiful objects must have circulated in 18th-century Europe, but they were almost all destroyed. The ones that do survive paint a colourful picture of a trade that made John and his colleagues very rich.

Pics: the top two images are from an 18th-century Norwich pattern book shown here; the lower ones are from a copy kept in the Victoria & Albert Museum in London (item 67-1885), more here.

printmakersopenforum:

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)

Unknown artists recording in print

mad-moiselle-bulle:

Wooden church of Transfiguration, Kizhi ( Russia ), assembled without nails, using interlocking corner joinery.

I do not wish women to have power over men; I wish them to have power over themselves.
Mary Wollstonecraft, from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (via eggs-flaurantine)

jaclcfrost:

"why do you like floral prints so much" because i’m not a person. secretly i’m just a mass of bees. trying to blend in with humans. unable to let go of my love of flowers

Ever since the 2004 decision of the Australian High Court in the Al-Kateb case, human rights advocates have worried that the Australian government can keep asylum seekers in detention indefinitely. Yesterday the Court for the first time spelled out the constitutional limits to mandatory immigration detention.

Immigration detention is lawful in three circumstances only:

  1.  if the government is considering whether to allow a person to apply for a visa;
  2. if the government is considering a person’s application for a visa; or
  3. if the government is deporting someone. Crucially, the Court also held that detention even on these grounds is unlawful unless “necessary and incidental” for those purposes.

Refugee lawyer Joyce Chia has an excellent summary of the Court’s decision in The Guardian.

What the government can’t do is detain a person purely to deter other asylum seekers, or while the government waits for the Senate to pass legislation reintroducing Temporary Protection Visas (TPVs).