Material World
johndarnielle:

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!
Hannah Rosengren 2013

you could really plant these in any vacant lot if you didn’t get caught, the ones on this list I’m familiar with grow with little or no tending! Free the Bee!

johndarnielle:

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!

Hannah Rosengren 2013

you could really plant these in any vacant lot if you didn’t get caught, the ones on this list I’m familiar with grow with little or no tending! Free the Bee!

ecowatchorg:

Victory: EU Votes to Ban Bee-Killing Pesticides
A landmark decision by the European Commission yesterday, means that bee-killing, neonicotinoid pesticides will experience a continent-wide ban in Europe for two years.

ecowatchorg:

Victory: EU Votes to Ban Bee-Killing Pesticides

A landmark decision by the European Commission yesterday, means that bee-killing, neonicotinoid pesticides will experience a continent-wide ban in Europe for two years.

a-cottage-in-the-woods:

source: fine Gardening
~ wonderful bee skep

a-cottage-in-the-woods:

source: fine Gardening

~ wonderful bee skep

socialuprooting:

Poland will impose a complete ban on growing the MON810 genetically modified strain of maize made by US company Monsanto on its territory, Agriculture Minister Marek Sawicki said Wednesday.

“The decree is in the works. It introduces a complete ban on the MON810 strain of maize in Poland,” Sawicki told reporters, adding that pollen of this strain could have a harmful effect on bees.

On March 9, seven European countries — Belgium, Britain, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Ireland and Slovakia — blocked a proposal by the Danish EU presidency to allow the cultivation of genetically-modified plants on the continent.

Seven days after that, France imposed a temporary ban on the MON810 strain.

Talks on allowing the growing of genetically-modified plants on EU soil are now deadlocked as no majority has emerged among the 27 member states.

Soggy wet bee (by nutmeg66)

Soggy wet bee (by nutmeg66)


Although news about Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has died down, commercial beekeepers have seen average population losses of about 30 percent each year since 2006, said Paul Towers, of the Pesticide Action Network. …
In addition to continued reports of CCD — a still somewhat mysterious phenomenon in which entire bee colonies literally disappear, alien-abduction style, leaving not even their dead bodies behind — bee populations are suffering poor health in general, and experiencing shorter life spans and diminished vitality. And while parasites, pathogens, and habitat loss can deal blows to bee health, research increasingly points to pesticides as the primary culprit.
via Honeybee problem nearing a ‘critical point’ | Grist

"alien abduction style"?!  had to reblog for this ingenious new angle: are the CIA abducting the bees, to pollinate new plant cities on the moon, in readiness of Newt’s space colony? Like that Dr. Who episode?

Although news about Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has died down, commercial beekeepers have seen average population losses of about 30 percent each year since 2006, said Paul Towers, of the Pesticide Action Network. …

In addition to continued reports of CCD — a still somewhat mysterious phenomenon in which entire bee colonies literally disappear, alien-abduction style, leaving not even their dead bodies behind — bee populations are suffering poor health in general, and experiencing shorter life spans and diminished vitality. And while parasites, pathogens, and habitat loss can deal blows to bee health, research increasingly points to pesticides as the primary culprit.

via Honeybee problem nearing a ‘critical point’ | Grist

"alien abduction style"?!  had to reblog for this ingenious new angle: are the CIA abducting the bees, to pollinate new plant cities on the moon, in readiness of Newt’s space colony? Like that Dr. Who episode?

(via Bees and their role in your garden » Sustainable Gardening Australia)
Without honey bees, many of our crops don’t produce, or they produce very poorly. Honey bees pollinate fruits, nuts, grains, and vegetables. Care for your garden as if it’s a honeybee playground. 
Don’t use chemicals in the garden. Some chemicals might hurt honey bees. Go organic.
If you must treat against insects, do so in the evening after bees have gone home.
Bio-diversity, grow a range of plants that flower in each season so there is always bee food available.
Let herbs (and other plants) flower as late into autumn as they want. If they’re flowering, don’t pull them until after frost has knocked them down.
Provide sheltered spaces in your garden where bees can get out of wind and rain.
BECOME A BEE KEEPER! It stands to reason: if more people raise bees, there are more hives, there are more bees.

(via Bees and their role in your garden » Sustainable Gardening Australia)

Without honey bees, many of our crops don’t produce, or they produce very poorly. Honey bees pollinate fruits, nuts, grains, and vegetables. Care for your garden as if it’s a honeybee playground.

  • Don’t use chemicals in the garden. Some chemicals might hurt honey bees. Go organic.
  • If you must treat against insects, do so in the evening after bees have gone home.
  • Bio-diversity, grow a range of plants that flower in each season so there is always bee food available.
  • Let herbs (and other plants) flower as late into autumn as they want. If they’re flowering, don’t pull them until after frost has knocked them down.
  • Provide sheltered spaces in your garden where bees can get out of wind and rain.
  • BECOME A BEE KEEPER! It stands to reason: if more people raise bees, there are more hives, there are more bees.
(via 10 amazing healing plants from your garden: Lavender | MNN - Mother Nature Network)

Lavender comes from the Latin root lavare, which means “to wash.” While lavender is well-known for its fragrance, it also has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties.

Things I didn’t know about what I grow.

(via 10 amazing healing plants from your garden: Lavender | MNN - Mother Nature Network)

Lavender comes from the Latin root lavare, which means “to wash.” While lavender is well-known for its fragrance, it also has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties.

Things I didn’t know about what I grow.

A kid told me at our public gardening workshop last weekend, that honey comes from bears. He’d seen so many comics, stories and TV shows with bears nomming on honeycomb that he figured that’s what ‘honeybear’ meant. He was so proud of having the answer, and so excited about bears - which we don’t have in Australia - I hardly had the heart to give him the big reveal about bees.

A kid told me at our public gardening workshop last weekend, that honey comes from bears. He’d seen so many comics, stories and TV shows with bears nomming on honeycomb that he figured that’s what ‘honeybear’ meant. He was so proud of having the answer, and so excited about bears - which we don’t have in Australia - I hardly had the heart to give him the big reveal about bees.

(via Pessimistic bees forgo life’s pleasures › News in Science (ABC Science))

Bee-ing stressed has predictable consequences: a pessimistic outlook and a loss of interest in what are normally pleasurable activities.
And, according to researchers from Newcastle University, England, it’s no different for the humble honey bee.
Their research, published online today in the journal  Current Biology, shows for the first time that an invertebrate can exhibit similar physiological and behavioural changes to humans who are anxious or depressed.
Lead author Dr Melissa Bateson says when we are feeling anxious or depressed, we make very different decisions from when we are happy, and interpret ambiguous signals as negative.

Colony Collapse Disorder = bees heard about Monsato’s global monopolies against seed saving, now totally bummed out.

(via Pessimistic bees forgo life’s pleasures › News in Science (ABC Science))

Bee-ing stressed has predictable consequences: a pessimistic outlook and a loss of interest in what are normally pleasurable activities.

And, according to researchers from Newcastle University, England, it’s no different for the humble honey bee.

Their research, published online today in the journal Current Biology, shows for the first time that an invertebrate can exhibit similar physiological and behavioural changes to humans who are anxious or depressed.

Lead author Dr Melissa Bateson says when we are feeling anxious or depressed, we make very different decisions from when we are happy, and interpret ambiguous signals as negative.

Colony Collapse Disorder = bees heard about Monsato’s global monopolies against seed saving, now totally bummed out.

iheartbees:

Vegan Beekeepingby blog.lagusta.com
The vegan ethic is complex and nuanced.  Any vegan that says otherwise is itching for a (respectful, intelligent, I hope) fight.  So I may as well be calling this piece, ‘It’s actually impossible to be vegan, but we are all doing our best.’  To me, veganism is about trying to live in harmony with the planet.  My beekeeping is not an exception to my veganism.  It is a well-thought out amendment. It might even make me a better vegan, depending on how much of this you follow along with.
Still, I am a beekeeper and I am a vegan and that is a sticking point for about 50% of the vegans I know.  This is my attempt to explain my position.  I am vegan because I deeply care about animal rights.  I dig the other benefits, but in my heart, I believe eating animals is wrong. My purpose for saying so is that it needs to be clear from the start that I really care about bees. I am not arguing that I think killing bees or treating them with anything but the utmost respect is OK.  I don’t keep bees because they fall outside of my deeply felt consideration.  In fact, I think bees are amazing… 
Whenever I think about the shortcomings of the human species, I always end up being reminded of the near perfection of bees.  Selfless, female-dominated, self-reliant, dancing, mysterious bees.
Human life as we know it is dependent on bees. It is true that there are wild bee populations; but they are dying. It is a widely held belief within the beekeeping community, and those educated about what commercial beekeeping has done to the world’s bee population, that small-scale “backyard beekeepers” hold the key to preserving disease resistant stock that can survive to pollinate all the foods upon which vegans and non-vegans rely. About 1/3 of the human diet can be traced back to bee pollinated foods…
The point is vegans need plants, and plants need bees.  And bees make honey.
Click here to read the full blog post

I love La Gusta! She’s one of the few vegan bloggers I read, along with Breeze Harper, Leigh-Chantall and some food activists who don’t use the v-words much since they have other cultural frameworks for their non-animal diets.
Also, bees are awesome because fresh honey smells sooo good! 

iheartbees:

Vegan Beekeeping
by blog.lagusta.com

The vegan ethic is complex and nuanced.  Any vegan that says otherwise is itching for a (respectful, intelligent, I hope) fight.  So I may as well be calling this piece, ‘It’s actually impossible to be vegan, but we are all doing our best.’  To me, veganism is about trying to live in harmony with the planet.  My beekeeping is not an exception to my veganism.  It is a well-thought out amendment. It might even make me a better vegan, depending on how much of this you follow along with.

Still, I am a beekeeper and I am a vegan and that is a sticking point for about 50% of the vegans I know.  This is my attempt to explain my position.  I am vegan because I deeply care about animal rights.  I dig the other benefits, but in my heart, I believe eating animals is wrong. My purpose for saying so is that it needs to be clear from the start that I really care about bees. I am not arguing that I think killing bees or treating them with anything but the utmost respect is OK.  I don’t keep bees because they fall outside of my deeply felt consideration.  In fact, I think bees are amazing… 

Whenever I think about the shortcomings of the human species, I always end up being reminded of the near perfection of bees.  Selfless, female-dominated, self-reliant, dancing, mysterious bees.

Human life as we know it is dependent on bees. It is true that there are wild bee populations; but they are dying. It is a widely held belief within the beekeeping community, and those educated about what commercial beekeeping has done to the world’s bee population, that small-scale “backyard beekeepers” hold the key to preserving disease resistant stock that can survive to pollinate all the foods upon which vegans and non-vegans rely. About 1/3 of the human diet can be traced back to bee pollinated foods…

The point is vegans need plants, and plants need bees.  And bees make honey.

Click here to read the full blog post

I love La Gusta! She’s one of the few vegan bloggers I read, along with Breeze Harper, Leigh-Chantall and some food activists who don’t use the v-words much since they have other cultural frameworks for their non-animal diets.

Also, bees are awesome because fresh honey smells sooo good! 

Queen of The Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us? 

Official Trailer [HD] by Collectiveeye

QUEEN OF THE SUN: What Are the Bees Telling Us? is a profound, alternative look at the global bee crisis from Taggart Siegel, director of THE REAL DIRT ON FARMER JOHN.

Taking us on a journey through the catastrophic disappearance of bees and the mysterious world of the beehive, this engaging and ultimately uplifting film weaves an unusual and dramatic story of the heartfelt struggles of beekeepers, scientists and philosophers from around the world including Michael Pollan, Gunther Hauk and Vandana Shiva. Together they reveal both the problems and the solutions in renewing a culture in balance with nature.

Queen of the Sun

Will possibly be twee and urban oriented as anything, but I’m gonna see it.

zuky:

Yesterday our garden community also visited a honeybee farm in Surrey, where they sold all manner of honeybee-related products, including these flavored “honeysticks” which I thought were kind of fun (though I didn’t buy any; I’m too nerdy-economical, plus I don’t do sweets). I did buy a special jar of honey mixed with pollen, propolis, and royal jelly; it contains magical properties which I’ll be mixing into my tea every morning. Royal jelly is used in traditional Chinese medicine; my parents gave it to me every day when I was around puberty. We’ll see how it works for me now. I also learned that honeybee colony collapse disorder is not an issue in this region and is regarded here as a US problem, which has me wondering.

That’s interesting, about the perceptions of CCD being a US problem.
With so many non-USA farmers experiencing significant, ongoing colony reductions and non-USA agricultural bodies researching similar causes …it still seems that people outside the USA reject or at least downplay the practice of naming and approaching the pattern as an umbrella disorder. 
Cultural differences in discussing science + politics?
Or the national gaps in abandoning suspect pesticides for upped integrated bee health measures. and the intensity of monocropping for a large export market in bee dependent crops?
OTOH, Australia isn’t experiencing comparable trends to CCD, despite still legal use of some pesticides banned in many EU states. But there’s a large shift underway to mixed or partial organic methods here rather than intensive mono-cropping anyway.

zuky:

Yesterday our garden community also visited a honeybee farm in Surrey, where they sold all manner of honeybee-related products, including these flavored “honeysticks” which I thought were kind of fun (though I didn’t buy any; I’m too nerdy-economical, plus I don’t do sweets). I did buy a special jar of honey mixed with pollen, propolis, and royal jelly; it contains magical properties which I’ll be mixing into my tea every morning. Royal jelly is used in traditional Chinese medicine; my parents gave it to me every day when I was around puberty. We’ll see how it works for me now. I also learned that honeybee colony collapse disorder is not an issue in this region and is regarded here as a US problem, which has me wondering.

That’s interesting, about the perceptions of CCD being a US problem.

With so many non-USA farmers experiencing significant, ongoing colony reductions and non-USA agricultural bodies researching similar causes …it still seems that people outside the USA reject or at least downplay the practice of naming and approaching the pattern as an umbrella disorder. 

Cultural differences in discussing science + politics?

Or the national gaps in abandoning suspect pesticides for upped integrated bee health measures. and the intensity of monocropping for a large export market in bee dependent crops?

OTOH, Australia isn’t experiencing comparable trends to CCD, despite still legal use of some pesticides banned in many EU states. But there’s a large shift underway to mixed or partial organic methods here rather than intensive mono-cropping anyway.

Colony collapse disorder has decimated honey bee populations. Now a census of bumble bees shows a 96% population collapse of 4 major U.S. species of bumble bees.

Related: some ‘natural’ insecticides also kill bees.

If an insecticide is labelled as 100% DIY and natural because it uses strong plant oils - but operates by causing nerve damage to any insects feeding on the plants you sprayed - you’ll kill the bees too and it’s a cruel way to do it.

Whereas planting more flowers to sustain insects and birds plus using other barriers [netting, crop mixing, increased indoor vertical farming] and minus such concentrated sprays for infestations = restoring balance better over time.

{I’m talking about small scale growers here, but there’s a lot of shift to small scale}

This is where I differ from some vegan or non-farming eco-concerned people about owning insects, fish, fowl and animals. Like, a lot.

Every crop producer on land which isn’t intensely urbanized could have a bee hive, every urban plan should include green corridors including measures to protect migratory species.

If you eat, and are seeking ways to exist healthier in urban spaces - which many people are or want to - then plant the flowers, foster bees. If you actually own or lease some space, then even rehabilitate some native birds, get to know the surrounding people and land uses and get ducks, chooks maybe even a pig - whichever complements those uses and will be do-able for the animals. Pigs do wonders for pest and weed control, srsly. And they’re cute and friendly as hell.

Or grow some ‘public’ fruit bearing plants for local species to nom in an abandonded space in your suburb, the people there who can’t own or lease land will be able to enjoy it too.

Big unused lawns, misleadingly ‘natural’ toxics and empty allotments are a waste-in habitats where people are alienated, hungry and other species are poisoned out.  That’s a bigger deal imo, than being proud to never use beeswax but never supporting a hive or food alternatives radical and flexibile enough for other people to really adapt.  

Don’t like abuse to animals though? Simple: treat the bees, birds and pigs well.

I don’t believe in child abuse, but I wouldn’t pretend bragging about not having child labour in your business was a one size fits all solution to it either.