Material World
nezua:

riverlandfarm:

gelkultur is a German term that roughly translates to “mound culture”. The hugelkultur gardening method has been used in Eastern Europe for centuries and is essentially a sheet-composting method that involves burying woody debris (logs, branches, sticks) and other organic matter under a mound of earth.
This is a great way to grow food in your garden while recycling all at the same time, you could even have more sq footage than regular raised beds. The soil would be nutrient rich because of the wood rotting inside, I would almost want to put food scraps and egg shells etc in the soil while building this. All in all I think I will be trying this.
Photo Credit: arcadia-farms.net
Forget Raised Beds, Try Hugelkultur

Interesting. I have raised beds…I wonder if I should experiment with this method this summer.

I started on this last year when we had an overload of branches and cuttings after a pruning fest. They’re taking a while to rot down - so much wood! - but  even in the small space I used for the two we have, it’s given a much better surface than flat beds did to regulate shade for heat vulnerable plants.  I did put food compost + manure in, but right in the middle/inside the branches, because I was afraid the possums would go digging.

nezua:

riverlandfarm:

gelkultur is a German term that roughly translates to “mound culture”. The hugelkultur gardening method has been used in Eastern Europe for centuries and is essentially a sheet-composting method that involves burying woody debris (logs, branches, sticks) and other organic matter under a mound of earth.

This is a great way to grow food in your garden while recycling all at the same time, you could even have more sq footage than regular raised beds. The soil would be nutrient rich because of the wood rotting inside, I would almost want to put food scraps and egg shells etc in the soil while building this. All in all I think I will be trying this.

Photo Credit: arcadia-farms.net

Forget Raised Beds, Try Hugelkultur

Interesting. I have raised beds…I wonder if I should experiment with this method this summer.

I started on this last year when we had an overload of branches and cuttings after a pruning fest. They’re taking a while to rot down - so much wood! - but  even in the small space I used for the two we have, it’s given a much better surface than flat beds did to regulate shade for heat vulnerable plants.  I did put food compost + manure in, but right in the middle/inside the branches, because I was afraid the possums would go digging.

(via jessicaNdesigns: DIY Indoor Succulent Garden)
(via » the celebration continues at the Atlanta Botanical Garden crack the plates)
johndarnielle:

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!
Hannah Rosengren 2013

you could really plant these in any vacant lot if you didn’t get caught, the ones on this list I’m familiar with grow with little or no tending! Free the Bee!

johndarnielle:

byhannahrosengren:

Plant These To Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants. Learn more here!

Hannah Rosengren 2013

you could really plant these in any vacant lot if you didn’t get caught, the ones on this list I’m familiar with grow with little or no tending! Free the Bee!

(via Garden bird foods birdseed bungee jumper)
lianabrooks:

The squash grow up an arched trellis so they stay off the ground and you can harvest them from below. Isn’t this a great idea? So pretty!

lianabrooks:

The squash grow up an arched trellis so they stay off the ground and you can harvest them from below. Isn’t this a great idea? So pretty!

agypsycrystal:

Keep your arsenal handy

agypsycrystal:

Keep your arsenal handy

solarscallop:hand stamped spoon by VintageGardenArt on etsy

solarscallop:hand stamped spoon by VintageGardenArt on etsy

crystalanne26:

I just finished reading the extension services’ “growing potatoes in Alaska” and thought I would share a few things I learned!

POTATO FACTS:

1. SEED POTATOES Refers to potatoes (small potatoes or pieces of larger potatoes )that are specifically grown to start the next season’s crop. It is important (if you buy potato pieces) to buy ones with a lot of “eyes” it is equally important to use certified seed potatoes because they will minimize the possibility of introducing diseases into the garden.  …

verticaltheory:

Fractal Garden, Legge Lewis Legge
seedstofeedrooftopfarm:

intothewildfire:


funny, we do both here…

seedstofeedrooftopfarm:

intothewildfire:

funny, we do both here…

(via The aerial edible garden and other urban adventures| plants are the new paint

sustainable-sam:

epicurious:

enochliew:

Edible Garden at the Atlanta Botanical Garden

It includes a herb wall and outdoor kitchen where top chefs present cooking classes.

<SWOON>

So gorgeous… Need to work on a mini herb wall. 

bloemist:livinglovingbetter:








Love this - (via 3 Ways to Go Vertical with Your Garden)




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