Material World
Cherryville, North Carolina (1908) (by Knoxville Museum of Art)

Cherryville, North Carolina (1908) (by Knoxville Museum of Art)

penda-kenya:

My new love, Barbara Smith, a Black lesbian feminist writer and activist who has been committed to the movement of women of color and Black feminist thought since 1973. Also, co-founder of Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press with Audre Lorde and Cherrie Moraga. 


Broadsheet, a monthly feminist magazine produced in Auckland from 1972 to 1997 and sold throughout New Zealand, played an important part in women’s activism. Reporting on everything from politics to art to sexuality to crime, the magazine was a forum in which women expressed a broad range of concerns. Māori issues were at times a particularly strong focus, provoking fierce exchanges in the letters pages. Broadsheet also reported on socio-economic class and the position of women in unions. This issue from June 1985 featured articles on the impact of GST (goods and services tax), Māori women and the Human Rights Commission, and bulimia. (via Broadsheet - Gender inequalities - Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand)

Broadsheet, a monthly feminist magazine produced in Auckland from 1972 to 1997 and sold throughout New Zealand, played an important part in women’s activism. Reporting on everything from politics to art to sexuality to crime, the magazine was a forum in which women expressed a broad range of concerns. Māori issues were at times a particularly strong focus, provoking fierce exchanges in the letters pages. Broadsheet also reported on socio-economic class and the position of women in unions. This issue from June 1985 featured articles on the impact of GST (goods and services tax), Māori women and the Human Rights Commission, and bulimia. (via Broadsheet - Gender inequalities - Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand)

paulbeige:

Australia was invaded not settled. Saturday 26 January is ‘Australia Day’; I’ll be celebrating Invasion Day.
Our bbq invite declares “No flags, no anthems (except disco ones).”
This weekend is also the 75th anniversary of the Day of Mourning declaration: Australia Day 1938 was the sesquicentennial of British colonisation in Australia, and was declared an Aboriginal Day of Mourning, a day to demand full citizenship rights for Indigenous Australians. It took until 1967 for Indigenous Australians to even be counted as people in the census. Until then, they were listed with flora and fauna.

paulbeige:

Australia was invaded not settled. Saturday 26 January is ‘Australia Day’; I’ll be celebrating Invasion Day.

Our bbq invite declares “No flags, no anthems (except disco ones).”

This weekend is also the 75th anniversary of the Day of Mourning declaration: Australia Day 1938 was the sesquicentennial of British colonisation in Australia, and was declared an Aboriginal Day of Mourning, a day to demand full citizenship rights for Indigenous Australians. It took until 1967 for Indigenous Australians to even be counted as people in the census. Until then, they were listed with flora and fauna.

dawntree:

If She Grows Up Gay

TW - Mention of Sexual Assault

A blue collar African-American mother, talks about her pregnancy and raising her daughter with her lesbian lover.

crisis-now:read.








In this gripping memoir of the AIDS years (1981–1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generation’s imagination and the consequences of that loss.








On the to read list. I’m very open to her POV on queer radicalism being supplanted by gay conservatism.  [Though I think a lot of online white queer radicals  have more in common with both gay conservatives and radfems than they think. Especially in their ready erasure of the politics and very mixed groups at the center of the epidemic now and then.  If your definition of queer omits the role of the epidemic in popularizing the term, and erases or imposes false divisions on the atypical mix of people involved in applying the radicalism you only talk about to that particular crisis, that tells me a lot about your reality vs. your semantics]
otoh not sure I’m ready for both [more!] archiving of that era/generational loss and the tiny risk of white queer boomer nostalgia [AIDS is hardly over]. Schulman usually has some points worth hearing though. anyone read it yet?

crisis-now:read.

In this gripping memoir of the AIDS years (1981–1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generation’s imagination and the consequences of that loss.

On the to read list. I’m very open to her POV on queer radicalism being supplanted by gay conservatism.  [Though I think a lot of online white queer radicals  have more in common with both gay conservatives and radfems than they think. Especially in their ready erasure of the politics and very mixed groups at the center of the epidemic now and then.  If your definition of queer omits the role of the epidemic in popularizing the term, and erases or imposes false divisions on the atypical mix of people involved in applying the radicalism you only talk about to that particular crisis, that tells me a lot about your reality vs. your semantics]

otoh not sure I’m ready for both [more!] archiving of that era/generational loss and the tiny risk of white queer boomer nostalgia [AIDS is hardly over]. Schulman usually has some points worth hearing though. anyone read it yet?

(image via Eugenia Falleni by Mark Tedeschi  The Women’s Bookshop)





On July 5, 1920 Harry Crawford was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife Annie Birkett, whose body had been found off Mowbray Road in Lane Cove, Sydney. But Harry was not, in fact, Harry. He was Eugenia Falleni, a woman who had lived as a man in Australia for 22 years.In Eugenia, renowned barrister and Crown Prosecutor Mark Tedeschi explores the story of one of the most extraordinary criminal trials in Australia’s legal history. Capturing what life was really like in Eugenia’s times, Tedeschi reveals how the full weight of the law and public opinion came crashing down on her, branding her a complete outcast and a serious menace to the moral fabric of society.From escaping her misunderstood childhood to her transition to living as a man, her marriages and her eventual trial for murder, this is the gritty and truly gripping story of one of Australia’s most misunderstood accused persons.
blurb via http://www.eugeniafalleni.com.au/





Believe it or not this is one of the less sensationalist blurbs for this book.
The author seems more interested in the legal aspects of how the defense failed Harry Crawford [what the subject called himself] than how the main protagonists saw themselves.
There have been numerous cases of ‘sex fraud’ scandals in western history in the last century - where couples brought to trial or made infamous post-humously -  encompassed both consenting lesbian or transgender relationships forced to change their stories in an attempt to minimize persecution, or cases where actual domestic deception and abuse were nonetheless subject to levels of sensationalism and persecution unseen in commonplace “straight white cis dude abuses his wife” cases. 
I don’t know what the story is in Harry’s case, possibly no one really does in hindsight.  I’m going to get the book anyway, because there are so few historical records of queer people’s lives before the gay liberation era here, and I’m hoping for some primary accounts of their identifications and relationships.

(image via Eugenia Falleni by Mark Tedeschi  The Women’s Bookshop)

On July 5, 1920 Harry Crawford was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife Annie Birkett, whose body had been found off Mowbray Road in Lane Cove, Sydney. But Harry was not, in fact, Harry. He was Eugenia Falleni, a woman who had lived as a man in Australia for 22 years.

In Eugenia, renowned barrister and Crown Prosecutor Mark Tedeschi explores the story of one of the most extraordinary criminal trials in Australia’s legal history. Capturing what life was really like in Eugenia’s times, Tedeschi reveals how the full weight of the law and public opinion came crashing down on her, branding her a complete outcast and a serious menace to the moral fabric of society.

From escaping her misunderstood childhood to her transition to living as a man, her marriages and her eventual trial for murder, this is the gritty and truly gripping story of one of Australia’s most misunderstood accused persons.

blurb via http://www.eugeniafalleni.com.au/

Believe it or not this is one of the less sensationalist blurbs for this book.

The author seems more interested in the legal aspects of how the defense failed Harry Crawford [what the subject called himself] than how the main protagonists saw themselves.

There have been numerous cases of ‘sex fraud’ scandals in western history in the last century - where couples brought to trial or made infamous post-humously -  encompassed both consenting lesbian or transgender relationships forced to change their stories in an attempt to minimize persecution, or cases where actual domestic deception and abuse were nonetheless subject to levels of sensationalism and persecution unseen in commonplace “straight white cis dude abuses his wife” cases. 

I don’t know what the story is in Harry’s case, possibly no one really does in hindsight.  I’m going to get the book anyway, because there are so few historical records of queer people’s lives before the gay liberation era here, and I’m hoping for some primary accounts of their identifications and relationships.

The term “illegal immigrant” was first used in 1939 as a slur by the British toward Jews who were fleeing the Nazis and entering Palestine without authorization. Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel aptly said that “no human being is illegal.”

Tracey Moffatt Night Cries: A Rural Tragedy (1989) 1 (by artpopulus)

Synopsis A short experimental film shot totally in a studio, it is about the relationship between an Aboriginal daughter and her white mother. The daughter, now the sole carer of her dying mother, dreams of far away places.

Curator’s notes A short film written and directed by Tracey Moffatt, Night Cries is promoted as a possible sequel to Chauvel’s feature film Jedda. What would have happened had Jedda survived, and became the primary carer of her white mother?

Moffatt, one of Australia’s most famous visual artists whose work is internationally acclaimed, continues her use of constructed environments, with no outdoor scenes filmed in this work. Shot entirely indoors, the design work of Steven Curtis in Night Cries can also be seen in Moffatt’s feature film BeDevil. The beautiful use of rich colours, reflections and sounds open up the indoor environment of the set, and suggests the grand expanse of physical landscapes.

Moffatt’s use of famous Aboriginal singer Jimmy Little, who sings ‘Royal Telephone’ in Night Cries, evokes the presence of Christianity, and its role in the assimilation of Aboriginal peoples. The haunting textures of the painted landscape can then perhaps be reflective of a gradual change in how Aboriginal people relate to the land as a consequence of assimilation. The haunted look in the eyes of the Aboriginal daughter (Marcia Langton), is loaded with a sense of what could have been.

The final scene of Night Cries is reminiscent of a scene from Jedda, when the newborn infant is laid on the table next to the white mistress of the house, and both begin to cry. This scene in Night Cries revisits the pain and anguish of Jedda, as the now grown Aboriginal daughter lies in a foetal position next to her white mother, and once again cries. Assimilation, then, can be understood as a pain experienced by both the Aboriginal daughter, as well as the white mother.

Tracey Moffatt is an artist who continues to challenge the social construction of Aboriginality and how it is nationally and internationally viewed. Romaine Moreton, curator

2 cents = didn’t think it was especially about the white mother, so much as the emotional/relational aspects of the Stolen Generations typically left off screen in action and conflict focused ‘epic historical battle between good and evil’ renditions. 

grrlandog:

Trio of 19thc. Carnival Knockdown Cat Dolls Dating from 1890 to the early 1900s, these are some of the earliest carnival knockdown dolls – also known as carnival punks that I’ve ever come across. Introduced more than 100 years ago, punks were used as targets in games of chance where the object was to knock them over with a baseball or softball on the chance of winning a prize. The three knockdowns here are constructed of heavy canvas filled with sawdust on a metal-clad wooden base. Unlike later examples designed with scary clown faces, these whimsical “cats” are as charming as they can be. The faces are hand painted, so each cat has a slightly different expression. At some point in their lives, the knockdowns were given girls’ names – Janice, Elaine, and Jean Joan – possibly by carnival employees who worked the game.

grrlandog:

Trio of 19thc. Carnival Knockdown Cat Dolls Dating from 1890 to the early 1900s, these are some of the earliest carnival knockdown dolls – also known as carnival punks that I’ve ever come across. Introduced more than 100 years ago, punks were used as targets in games of chance where the object was to knock them over with a baseball or softball on the chance of winning a prize. The three knockdowns here are constructed of heavy canvas filled with sawdust on a metal-clad wooden base. Unlike later examples designed with scary clown faces, these whimsical “cats” are as charming as they can be. The faces are hand painted, so each cat has a slightly different expression. At some point in their lives, the knockdowns were given girls’ names – Janice, Elaine, and Jean Joan – possibly by carnival employees who worked the game.

grand-bazaar: 1960 Mexico :: Irma González

grand-bazaar: 1960 Mexico :: Irma González

(via Megan Cope)

Toponyms  Place names are an important aspect of culture and identity as they provide location where history, events, landscapes and people are remembered, celebrated and continued. Toponyms are always reflective of the dominant culture and its position upon the land in which it occupies. Military topographical maps (circa 1935-41) of regions around Cairns and Cooktown are highlighted in these works. The use of language and basic cartographic symbology reveal a multilayered fluid landscape with dual histories & dual identities.

eta: this image is from Cope’s Mater Hospital Commission featuring reworked indigenous/colinizer overlaid Brisbane maps, not the FNQ works of Toponyms. I cheat because it’s such a good description. Go look at her blog why don’t you?

(via Megan Cope)

Toponyms  Place names are an important aspect of culture and identity as they provide location where history, events, landscapes and people are remembered, celebrated and continued.

Toponyms are always reflective of the dominant culture and its position upon the land in which it occupies. Military topographical maps (circa 1935-41) of regions around Cairns and Cooktown are highlighted in these works. The use of language and basic cartographic symbology reveal a multilayered fluid landscape with dual histories & dual identities.

eta: this image is from Cope’s Mater Hospital Commission featuring reworked indigenous/colinizer overlaid Brisbane maps, not the FNQ works of Toponyms. I cheat because it’s such a good description. Go look at her blog why don’t you?

Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Wearing a Concert Gown of White Crepe, 5 February 1967.

Throughout her career, both in the media and in publicity material, Te Kanawa’s being Māori was sometimes framed as adding interest to her story or as making her more exotic. Alan Armstrong, a reviewer for Te Ao Hou, suggested in 1967 that Te Kanawa’s ‘appeal’ lay partly in ‘her Maori ancestry’, and he noted that she was ‘unique’ because she was ‘the first Maori female singer of serious music to stand at the threshold of fame and fortune overseas’.
In the first biography published about Te Kanawa, an adulatory book written by Norman Harris when she was still in her early twenties, her Māori heritage formed a point of interest. The book began with a mythical story about Te Kanawa, ‘a warrior’ and ‘commanding’ leader, and ended with a description of her farewell from her ‘own people’.
This narrative of her life was written before it became widely known that she was adopted, which she revealed on British television in a BBC profile about her in 1975. Like other narratives written before this revelation, Harris presented her as a descendant of Māori aristocracy, adding to the exotic aura surrounding her. Pickles has observed this invention of ‘noble warrior connections’ for Te Kanawa, and the recurring transformation of such ‘chiefly connections’ into an aristocratic background.

MĀORI AND ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN THE PUBLIC EYE: REPRESENTING DIFFERENCE, 1950–2000. Online book by Karen Fox. This excerpt Ch. 3 ‘Exoticism and Glamour in the Performing Arts’

Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Wearing a Concert Gown of White Crepe, 5 February 1967.

Throughout her career, both in the media and in publicity material, Te Kanawa’s being Māori was sometimes framed as adding interest to her story or as making her more exotic. Alan Armstrong, a reviewer for Te Ao Hou, suggested in 1967 that Te Kanawa’s ‘appeal’ lay partly in ‘her Maori ancestry’, and he noted that she was ‘unique’ because she was ‘the first Maori female singer of serious music to stand at the threshold of fame and fortune overseas’.

In the first biography published about Te Kanawa, an adulatory book written by Norman Harris when she was still in her early twenties, her Māori heritage formed a point of interest. The book began with a mythical story about Te Kanawa, ‘a warrior’ and ‘commanding’ leader, and ended with a description of her farewell from her ‘own people’.

This narrative of her life was written before it became widely known that she was adopted, which she revealed on British television in a BBC profile about her in 1975. Like other narratives written before this revelation, Harris presented her as a descendant of Māori aristocracy, adding to the exotic aura surrounding her. Pickles has observed this invention of ‘noble warrior connections’ for Te Kanawa, and the recurring transformation of such ‘chiefly connections’ into an aristocratic background.

MĀORI AND ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN THE PUBLIC EYE: REPRESENTING DIFFERENCE, 1950–2000. Online book by Karen Fox. This excerpt Ch. 3 ‘Exoticism and Glamour in the Performing Arts’

Latin American Women Writers is an extensive searchable collection of prose, poetry, and drama composed by women writing in Mexico, Central America, and South America.

With over 100,000 pages of poetry, prose, and essays Latin American Women Writers accomplishes the difficult task of bringing together the most important women writers from the Ibero-American nations.

Spanning a period from the colonial era to the present day, the literary works, memoirs, feminist essays, and other materials give researchers the feminine perspective of the development of an entire continent. The writings also reveal the personal struggles and histories of the authors themselves.

The collection starts at the eighteenth-century with works by writers such as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Mexico), and Francisca Josefa de Castillo y Guevara (Colombia), with their plays, poetry, and other meditative texts. In the nineteenth century, women were able to start the critique of their own status within heavily patriarchal societies. Featured are works by Juana M. Gorriti (Argentina), Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda (Cuba), Delmira Agustini (Argentina), and Julia Lopes Almeida (Brazil), among others. Throughout the twentieth century we can see an increase in production and publication of women’s works. A number of important figures are present, such as Rachel de Queiroz (Brazil), Juana de Ibarbourou (Uruguay), Isidora Aguirre (Chile), Ida Granko (Venezuela), and Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay).

Besides the literary works, over 25% of the collection is comprised of feminist works. Writers such as Clorinda Matto de Turner (Peru), Nisia Floresta and Bertha Lutz (Brazil), and Luisa Capetillo (Puerto Rico) among many others are represented. Pamphlets, booklets, small serials and larger feminist newspapers were also included making this the largest electronic collection of Latin American feminist writings and feminism related materials available.

tumbled for history/arts relevance. As far as I can tell the search functions are only available in English to find the original Spanish and Portuguese texts??? Still a big improvement on the resources available [in this region at least] to research Latin American women’s role in literary/political history.

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama today. Said the president, ”Dolores was very gracious when I told her I had stolen her slogan, Si, se puede. Yes, we can. Knowing her, I’m pleased that she let me off easy— because Dolores does not play.”

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama today. Said the president, ”Dolores was very gracious when I told her I had stolen her slogan, Si, se puede. Yes, we can. Knowing her, I’m pleased that she let me off easy— because Dolores does not play.”