Material World
AIDS at 30: David Reid on Transgender AIDS Diva Connie Norman

Indian LGBT ‘Laxmi Narayan Tripathi’ (by Indian LGBT Films)

PROJECT BOLO, meaning ‘Project Speak Up’, offers role models by documenting Indian LGBT persons — their growing up, struggles, love, career, achievements and life.

This interview features LAXMI NARAYAN TRIPATHI. Laxmi has always loved to be in the limelight. Whether on stage as a dancer from the age of seven, or on a movie or television set, or under the gaze of news cameras across the world… Laxmi has been a showstealer. As India’s most visible and controversial Hijra (transgender), she has balanced working for the community at the grassroots as an activist with using her glamorous celebrity image to push the envelope right up to an UN task force meeting. Never scared to speak her mind, she also is perhaps one of the few Hijras to stay with her biological family and be accepted by them.

For more information and to read the transcript of the above interview please visit http://www.projectbolo.com/​laxmi.htm

Courtesy : Project Bolo - Indian LGBT Oral History Project

dalitwomenfight:

Transgender discrimination is more severe, I feel, than dalit experience in urban areas. On the one hand, transgenders can only get homes in dalit bastis as these are the only places where we can get any acceptance – but we usually have to pay higher rent than others. It hurts a bit when dalits discriminate, even though they discriminate less than savarnas – as it feels like my own people shouldn’t discriminate against me at all due to our shared understanding of oppression as dalit. It is paradoxical for me to face added social disadvantage as a transgender. I feel like oppressed groups should try to understand each other’s pain and work together. - See more at: http://sanhati.com/excerpted/6051/#sthash.AL0Grhmd.dpuf

Though Ash had begun enhancing his masculinity long before he transitioned, taking that first step was still no easy task. In the process of making his decision, Ash is clear to point out the significance of today’s online communities in making that step less daunting. “When I first knew about people that transitioned there wasn’t as much publicity, there wasn’t all the online stuff. It just really helped to see how others had coped with their journey and the impact it had on them.”
Noticing the importance of documentation in his own journey, and inspired by those who inspired him, Ash has now begun documenting the transitions of others. “I decided to keep documenting the journey for other people because it is a transition and you’re wanting to come to a point where you’re feeling more comfortable in your skin… Taking photos and documenting it and looking back on it, particularly when you get to a milestone, - like having top surgery or being a year on T [testosterone] - you really see big changes. It’s really interesting, going back through old videos and seeing how I’ve changed.”
(via ash documenting transition - donne restom | powderzine)

Though Ash had begun enhancing his masculinity long before he transitioned, taking that first step was still no easy task. In the process of making his decision, Ash is clear to point out the significance of today’s online communities in making that step less daunting. “When I first knew about people that transitioned there wasn’t as much publicity, there wasn’t all the online stuff. It just really helped to see how others had coped with their journey and the impact it had on them.”

Noticing the importance of documentation in his own journey, and inspired by those who inspired him, Ash has now begun documenting the transitions of others. “I decided to keep documenting the journey for other people because it is a transition and you’re wanting to come to a point where you’re feeling more comfortable in your skin… Taking photos and documenting it and looking back on it, particularly when you get to a milestone, - like having top surgery or being a year on T [testosterone] - you really see big changes. It’s really interesting, going back through old videos and seeing how I’ve changed.”

(via ash documenting transition - donne restom | powderzine)

Beyond the Gender Binary: Yee Won Chong at TEDxRainier (by TEDxTalks)

Yee Won Chong shares a story about the challenges of navigating the world while transgender, and provides suggestions on being a good ally.

Professor Kristen Schilt: Transgender Men and the Persistence of Gender Inequality (by ClaymanInstitute)

Abstract: Just One of the Guys? This article examines the reproduction of gendered workplace inequalities through in-depth interviews with female-to-male transsexuals (FTMs). Many FTMs enter the workforce as women and then transition to become men, an experience that can provide them with an “outsider-within” perspective on the “patriarchal dividend”—the advantages men in general gain from the subordination of women.

Many of the respondents in this article find themselves, as men, receiving more authority, reward, and respect in the workplace than they received as women, even when they remain in the same jobs. The author argues that their experiences can make the underpinnings of gendered workplace disparities visible and help illuminate how structural disadvantages for women are reproduced in workplace interactions. As tall, white FTMs see more advantages than short FTMs and FTMs of color, these experiences also illustrate how men’s gender advantages at work vary with characteristics such as race/ethnicity and body structure.

Alice Dreger notes, ‘Far more often, the concerns of intersex and transgender people represent opposite sides of the same coin: intersex people get surgeries they don’t want, and transgender people can’t get the surgeries they do want.’
From today’s post “New Rights for Intersex Newborns” at Painting On Scars. (via emilysullivansanford)
alloutorg:

Adela was one of our greatest inspirations this year. It’s clear Cuba’s attitude towards LGBT people is moving in the right direction, and that people not policy is our greatest hope for change. 

alloutorg:

Adela was one of our greatest inspirations this year. It’s clear Cuba’s attitude towards LGBT people is moving in the right direction, and that people not policy is our greatest hope for change. 

(image via Eugenia Falleni by Mark Tedeschi  The Women’s Bookshop)





On July 5, 1920 Harry Crawford was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife Annie Birkett, whose body had been found off Mowbray Road in Lane Cove, Sydney. But Harry was not, in fact, Harry. He was Eugenia Falleni, a woman who had lived as a man in Australia for 22 years.In Eugenia, renowned barrister and Crown Prosecutor Mark Tedeschi explores the story of one of the most extraordinary criminal trials in Australia’s legal history. Capturing what life was really like in Eugenia’s times, Tedeschi reveals how the full weight of the law and public opinion came crashing down on her, branding her a complete outcast and a serious menace to the moral fabric of society.From escaping her misunderstood childhood to her transition to living as a man, her marriages and her eventual trial for murder, this is the gritty and truly gripping story of one of Australia’s most misunderstood accused persons.
blurb via http://www.eugeniafalleni.com.au/





Believe it or not this is one of the less sensationalist blurbs for this book.
The author seems more interested in the legal aspects of how the defense failed Harry Crawford [what the subject called himself] than how the main protagonists saw themselves.
There have been numerous cases of ‘sex fraud’ scandals in western history in the last century - where couples brought to trial or made infamous post-humously -  encompassed both consenting lesbian or transgender relationships forced to change their stories in an attempt to minimize persecution, or cases where actual domestic deception and abuse were nonetheless subject to levels of sensationalism and persecution unseen in commonplace “straight white cis dude abuses his wife” cases. 
I don’t know what the story is in Harry’s case, possibly no one really does in hindsight.  I’m going to get the book anyway, because there are so few historical records of queer people’s lives before the gay liberation era here, and I’m hoping for some primary accounts of their identifications and relationships.

(image via Eugenia Falleni by Mark Tedeschi  The Women’s Bookshop)

On July 5, 1920 Harry Crawford was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife Annie Birkett, whose body had been found off Mowbray Road in Lane Cove, Sydney. But Harry was not, in fact, Harry. He was Eugenia Falleni, a woman who had lived as a man in Australia for 22 years.

In Eugenia, renowned barrister and Crown Prosecutor Mark Tedeschi explores the story of one of the most extraordinary criminal trials in Australia’s legal history. Capturing what life was really like in Eugenia’s times, Tedeschi reveals how the full weight of the law and public opinion came crashing down on her, branding her a complete outcast and a serious menace to the moral fabric of society.

From escaping her misunderstood childhood to her transition to living as a man, her marriages and her eventual trial for murder, this is the gritty and truly gripping story of one of Australia’s most misunderstood accused persons.

blurb via http://www.eugeniafalleni.com.au/

Believe it or not this is one of the less sensationalist blurbs for this book.

The author seems more interested in the legal aspects of how the defense failed Harry Crawford [what the subject called himself] than how the main protagonists saw themselves.

There have been numerous cases of ‘sex fraud’ scandals in western history in the last century - where couples brought to trial or made infamous post-humously -  encompassed both consenting lesbian or transgender relationships forced to change their stories in an attempt to minimize persecution, or cases where actual domestic deception and abuse were nonetheless subject to levels of sensationalism and persecution unseen in commonplace “straight white cis dude abuses his wife” cases. 

I don’t know what the story is in Harry’s case, possibly no one really does in hindsight.  I’m going to get the book anyway, because there are so few historical records of queer people’s lives before the gay liberation era here, and I’m hoping for some primary accounts of their identifications and relationships.

I urge people not to hitch the wagon of trans rights to the idea of inborn, dyadic, neurological differences. Brains are extraordinarily complex and shaped by culture and experience over time. Gender identities are multiple, gender roles constantly evolving, and gender expression varies widely from individual to individual. Intersex people face huge obstacles, and framing us as the lucky group to be emulated denies our suffering. The solution to transphobia is not neurology, but political activism.
Cary Gabriel Costello, “On Trans Gender Identity and the ‘Intersex Brain’”
http://trans-fusion.blogspot.com/2012/08/on-trans-gender-identity-and-intersex.html?m=1 (via feministsociology)
womenwhokickass:

Carmen Rupe: Why she kicks ass
She was a LGBT community pioneer, a performer, and mayoral candidate, who also was a prominent member of Agender, the New Zealand transgender group.
In 1957 she moved to Kings Cross and became the first Maori drag performer in Australia. She stripped, danced the hula, had two snakes, and joined the famous Les Girls revue.
She ran for mayor of Wellington in 1977 under the banner ‘Get in Behind’ promising gay marriage and legalized brothels.
In the 1950-60s, Carmen waited tables by day and worked the streets by night. In the pre-law reform days, police would pick trans sex workers off the streets, take them to the police station, hose them down and beat them. By the late ’90s, Carmen was the only surviving trans prostitute from that era. 
In 1968, she returned to New Zealand, and opened Carmen’s International Coffee Lounge, a sexually tolerant place where GLBT people would meet for tea, coffee and much more.  Because homosexuality was illegal, Carmen’s coffee lounge had an elaborate system of doors and stairways to allow patrons to escape discreetly if a police raid occurred.
“I had five bedrooms upstairs and turned it into a brothel. And so I always used to say to people, ‘tea and coffee downstairs but the sweets are upstairs’”. 
Forty years later, even when her ailing health became a problem, she lead the Decade of the Diva float at Sydney’s Mardi Gras on her mobility scooter.

passed away in 2011

womenwhokickass:

Carmen Rupe: Why she kicks ass

  • She was a LGBT community pioneer, a performer, and mayoral candidate, who also was a prominent member of Agender, the New Zealand transgender group.
  • In 1957 she moved to Kings Cross and became the first Maori drag performer in Australia. She stripped, danced the hula, had two snakes, and joined the famous Les Girls revue.
  • She ran for mayor of Wellington in 1977 under the banner ‘Get in Behind’ promising gay marriage and legalized brothels.
  • In the 1950-60s, Carmen waited tables by day and worked the streets by night. In the pre-law reform days, police would pick trans sex workers off the streets, take them to the police station, hose them down and beat them. By the late ’90s, Carmen was the only surviving trans prostitute from that era.
  • In 1968, she returned to New Zealand, and opened Carmen’s International Coffee Lounge, a sexually tolerant place where GLBT people would meet for tea, coffee and much more.  Because homosexuality was illegal, Carmen’s coffee lounge had an elaborate system of doors and stairways to allow patrons to escape discreetly if a police raid occurred.
  • “I had five bedrooms upstairs and turned it into a brothel. And so I always used to say to people, ‘tea and coffee downstairs but the sweets are upstairs’”.
  • Forty years later, even when her ailing health became a problem, she lead the Decade of the Diva float at Sydney’s Mardi Gras on her mobility scooter.

passed away in 2011

(via Sheridan Nilsson Photography: Carmen Rupe - Kings Cross Legend)
theselfmademen:

The way in which people interact with me because I’m disabled (I use a wheelchair most of the time) and the way in which people interact with me when they know I’m trans are quite similar. People think that this gives them some sort of a right to my body, a right to information about it, they’ll ask personal or invasive questions and not realise why those might not be appropriate. “Do you have a dick yet?” and “so what’s wrong? Why are you in a wheelchair?” don’t feel that different as questions, both uncomfortably invasive, and yet other disabled people ask me those sorts of questions about my transition, when I’m out, and other trans people ask me those sorts of questions about my disability when they know about it. I’ve had to work hard to reclaim the right to privacy about my body. Asking someone whether you can help them (and taking no for an answer), or asking someone their preferred pronouns, are far more appropriate than personal questions about somebody else’s body. Full Article

theselfmademen:

The way in which people interact with me because I’m disabled (I use a wheelchair most of the time) and the way in which people interact with me when they know I’m trans are quite similar. People think that this gives them some sort of a right to my body, a right to information about it, they’ll ask personal or invasive questions and not realise why those might not be appropriate. “Do you have a dick yet?” and “so what’s wrong? Why are you in a wheelchair?” don’t feel that different as questions, both uncomfortably invasive, and yet other disabled people ask me those sorts of questions about my transition, when I’m out, and other trans people ask me those sorts of questions about my disability when they know about it. I’ve had to work hard to reclaim the right to privacy about my body. Asking someone whether you can help them (and taking no for an answer), or asking someone their preferred pronouns, are far more appropriate than personal questions about somebody else’s body. Full Article

A “Transsexual Versus Transgender” Intervention* Julia Serano

Over the last year or so, I have read a number of blog entries and Facebook rants about the so-called “transsexual versus transgender” issue. For those who are unaware of this debate, it stems from a subset of transsexuals who feel that the transsexual community is not served well by being included under the transgender umbrella (some even go so far as to insist that there is a mutually-exclusive dichotomy between transsexual and transgender people). Along similar lines, these transsexuals also argue that inclusion under the LGBT umbrella does a disservice to the transsexual community, as it conflates two very different issues (i.e., sexual orientation and gender identity), and emboldens many cissexual LGB folks to appropriate trans identities and experiences, and to claim to speak on our behalf. I have purposefully tried to avoid entering into this debate, primarily because many (albeit certainly not all) of the umbrella critiques that I have read invoke horrible stereotypes, and sometimes even hate speech, to help bolster their case. I have seen blatantly homophobic and biphobic remarks made by some anti-umbrella advocates. One post I saw described bisexuals as sexual predators who fetishize and prey upon transsexuals - this comment draws on a long history of monosexist stereotypes of bisexuals as “sex crazed” and desiring “anything that moves,” and it deeply offended me as a bisexual trans woman. Along the same lines, anti-umbrella advocates often self-describe themselves as “real transsexuals” and dismiss those who support the transgender and LGBT umbrellas as being posers and mere fetishists. Some even cite Ray Blanchard’s sexualizing and scientifically incorrect theory of autogynephilia to make their point.
It is one thing to disagree with another person’s views about whether or not transsexuals should seek inclusion under the transgender and LGBT umbrellas. But when people stoop to the level of sexualizing those they disagree with, or dismissing them as “fakes,” then they are engaging in name calling rather than intellectual debate, and I want absolutely no part of it.
So like I said, I have mostly avoided this debate because of the name calling, disparaging stereotypes and nonconsensual sexualization that are sometimes associated with it. But recently, I read a post where someone referred to me as being firmly in the “transsexual” (rather than “transgender”) camp. This was the second time that I had seen such a claim, and frankly, it surprised me. Granted, in my book Whipping Girl, I argued that the transsexual experience is different from other transgender trajectories, and I also decried the manner in which some cissexual gays and lesbians appropriate transsexual identities. But I never once advocated that transsexuals should completely split off from the transgender or LGBT communities. Rather, my intention was constructive criticism - I hoped to make those alliances more aware and respectful of transsexual voices and perspectives. So, for the record, I am in the pro-umbrella camp, even though I acknowledge that sometimes umbrella politics are messy and less than equitable. In other words, I believe that the pros of umbrella politics outweigh the cons. But, of course, that is my opinion, and others may disagree. If we are going to have a serious discussion about this issue (i.e., one that does not sink into the abyss of sexualization, stereotypes and name calling), then it seems to me that there are at least three major issues that need to be addressed, but which have been largely absent from the debate thus far. (via Whipping Girl: A “Transsexual Versus Transgender” Intervention*)

so this went around before, but seems timely to recirculate.

A “Transsexual Versus Transgender” Intervention* Julia Serano

Over the last year or so, I have read a number of blog entries and Facebook rants about the so-called “transsexual versus transgender” issue. For those who are unaware of this debate, it stems from a subset of transsexuals who feel that the transsexual community is not served well by being included under the transgender umbrella (some even go so far as to insist that there is a mutually-exclusive dichotomy between transsexual and transgender people). Along similar lines, these transsexuals also argue that inclusion under the LGBT umbrella does a disservice to the transsexual community, as it conflates two very different issues (i.e., sexual orientation and gender identity), and emboldens many cissexual LGB folks to appropriate trans identities and experiences, and to claim to speak on our behalf. I have purposefully tried to avoid entering into this debate, primarily because many (albeit certainly not all) of the umbrella critiques that I have read invoke horrible stereotypes, and sometimes even hate speech, to help bolster their case. I have seen blatantly homophobic and biphobic remarks made by some anti-umbrella advocates. One post I saw described bisexuals as sexual predators who fetishize and prey upon transsexuals - this comment draws on a long history of monosexist stereotypes of bisexuals as “sex crazed” and desiring “anything that moves,” and it deeply offended me as a bisexual trans woman. Along the same lines, anti-umbrella advocates often self-describe themselves as “real transsexuals” and dismiss those who support the transgender and LGBT umbrellas as being posers and mere fetishists. Some even cite Ray Blanchard’s sexualizing and scientifically incorrect theory of autogynephilia to make their point.

It is one thing to disagree with another person’s views about whether or not transsexuals should seek inclusion under the transgender and LGBT umbrellas. But when people stoop to the level of sexualizing those they disagree with, or dismissing them as “fakes,” then they are engaging in name calling rather than intellectual debate, and I want absolutely no part of it.

So like I said, I have mostly avoided this debate because of the name calling, disparaging stereotypes and nonconsensual sexualization that are sometimes associated with it. But recently, I read a post where someone referred to me as being firmly in the “transsexual” (rather than “transgender”) camp. This was the second time that I had seen such a claim, and frankly, it surprised me. Granted, in my book Whipping Girl, I argued that the transsexual experience is different from other transgender trajectories, and I also decried the manner in which some cissexual gays and lesbians appropriate transsexual identities. But I never once advocated that transsexuals should completely split off from the transgender or LGBT communities. Rather, my intention was constructive criticism - I hoped to make those alliances more aware and respectful of transsexual voices and perspectives. So, for the record, I am in the pro-umbrella camp, even though I acknowledge that sometimes umbrella politics are messy and less than equitable. In other words, I believe that the pros of umbrella politics outweigh the cons. But, of course, that is my opinion, and others may disagree. If we are going to have a serious discussion about this issue (i.e., one that does not sink into the abyss of sexualization, stereotypes and name calling), then it seems to me that there are at least three major issues that need to be addressed, but which have been largely absent from the debate thus far. (via Whipping Girl: A “Transsexual Versus Transgender” Intervention*)

so this went around before, but seems timely to recirculate.

audaciaray:

The book, thanks to our Kickstarter backers, is done, printed, and en route to NYC!
(via Cooking in Heels: A Memoir Cookbook – by Ceyenne Doroshow)
In Cooking in Heels, Ceyenne Doroshow offers up 40 Southern-style favorites with a Caribbean twist. As a transgender woman who was inspired to write her book while serving prison time for a prostitution conviction, Ceyenne might not seem like the most likely representative of home cooked family values. But her book, which is peppered with good humor and begins with the story of her life, shows that food and love are the ties that bind, and family is what you make it.
If you want to be notified when the book goes on sale online, join our mailing list and check the “Cooking in Heels” box when it asks which list you want to be on.
Publication Date: October 5, 2012 112 pages, soft bound, full color with photos by Stacie Joy Published by Red Umbrella Project, New York Soft cover retail price: $17.99 – ISBN: 978-0-9882596-0-7 Ebook retail price: $9.99 – ISBN: 978-0-9882596-1-4
Cooking in Heels Book Release Party: Thursday, October 4th, 8 – 10 pm at Happy Ending Lounge (302 Broome Street, between Eldridge and Forsyth) in NYC. This is the first time books will be available! Ceyenne and friends will tell stories of food and survival, and the author will sign books. PLUS, there will be free food, cooked by the lady herself. Get there early to make sure you get some!

audaciaray:

The book, thanks to our Kickstarter backers, is done, printed, and en route to NYC!

(via Cooking in Heels: A Memoir Cookbook – by Ceyenne Doroshow)

In Cooking in Heels, Ceyenne Doroshow offers up 40 Southern-style favorites with a Caribbean twist. As a transgender woman who was inspired to write her book while serving prison time for a prostitution conviction, Ceyenne might not seem like the most likely representative of home cooked family values. But her book, which is peppered with good humor and begins with the story of her life, shows that food and love are the ties that bind, and family is what you make it.

If you want to be notified when the book goes on sale online, join our mailing list and check the “Cooking in Heels” box when it asks which list you want to be on.

Publication Date: October 5, 2012
112 pages, soft bound, full color with photos by Stacie Joy
Published by Red Umbrella Project, New York
Soft cover retail price: $17.99 – ISBN: 978-0-9882596-0-7
Ebook retail price: $9.99 – ISBN: 978-0-9882596-1-4

Cooking in Heels Book Release Party: Thursday, October 4th, 8 – 10 pm at Happy Ending Lounge (302 Broome Street, between Eldridge and Forsyth) in NYC. This is the first time books will be available! Ceyenne and friends will tell stories of food and survival, and the author will sign books. PLUS, there will be free food, cooked by the lady herself. Get there early to make sure you get some!